18-44 Segment 1: Looking Into Our Minds: How our brains perceive the world

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There are all sorts of myths about how we can avoid dementia or how to best brainstorm a new idea. We talk to a psychologist and author to get the inside scoop on how our minds really work, and why we just can’t resist the urge to watch cute animal videos online.

Guest:

  • Bob Duke, professor at the University of Texas-Austin, expert on music and human learning, co-host, “Two Guys on Your Head,” co-author, Brain Briefs: Answers to the most (and least) pressing questions about your mind

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18-42 Segment 2: What We Can Learn from Lists

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Lists are a part of our everyday. Often, they are a forgotten part of our everyday. But Shaun Usher read through countless lists to compile a stunning collection of lists throughout time that shed light on the times, our collective history, and the list makers themselves.

Guest:

  • Shaun Usher, author, Lists of Note: An eclectic collection deserving of a wider audience

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18-12 Segment 1: Racism In 2018

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Even though America’s founding fathers established in the Constitution that all men are created equal, and slavery was abolished not long after, many still question if we truly do live in a society guided by true equality. While some people would argue that we do, studies have shown that may not entirely be true. Paul Kivel, activist and author of Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work For Racial Justice, states that there are persistent levels of racism that are deeply-rooted in American society from the education system to job markets and housing. Racial discrimination and marginalization still seem to play a large role in determining an individual’s ability to reap benefits and be successful in American society.

One reason that racism is still found in society today is that some people believe we live in a post-racial era. Kivel believes this idea stems from the fact that the United States had a two-term black president. Since Obama was elected as president, it has been hard for some people to understand that placing a person of color in a position of power was not the beginning of a post-racial society. Bruce Haynes, professor of sociology at the University of California-Davis and author of Down the Up Staircase: Three Generations of a Harlem Family, explains that this is a flawed belief because it is more of an exception in current culture rather than a much broader rule. Simply because one person of color was given an advantage that made them capable of maneuvering upwards in politics; it’s not an indication that all people of color have similar opportunities for success. Haynes explains that there are instances where white skin enables an individual to walk certain paths, while black skin often cannot. In order to achieve a post-racial culture, all people need to become less racially biased in all instances, not just in a few. 

So, what should people be doing in order to be an ally to people of color? Kivel explains that it is usually people of color who are educating the public on movements, but that there has never been a majority of white individuals, in powerful positions working together. He states that silence in the white community is doing more harm than overt racism. Yet, it is difficult for people to identify an appropriate way to be more active. Kivel explains that one way to begin overcoming the issue of silent complacency is to not let other people’s comments that have racist undertones be overlooked. At the time that it happens, the person may not understand the problem with their comment, but by addressing the racist statement that individual may later reflect on the comment, or it could even encourage others who heard the interaction to think about the repercussions of their own comments in the future. Despite the strides that have been made to combat racism, it is more important than ever to continue to fight the racism and silence in the United States. 

Guest:

  • Paul Kivel, activist and author of Uprooting Racism: How White People Can Work For Racial Justice
  • Bruce Haynes, professor of sociology at the University of California-Davis and author of Down the Up Staircase: Three Generations of a Harlem Family

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17-48 Segment 2: W.E.B. Du Bois’s Lasting Impact in Sociology

 

At the beginning of the 20th century, W.E.B. Du Bois revolutionized scientific sociology, but was denied accolades because of his race. Now, we talk to scholars about what exactly Du Bois did to improve the study of sociology and what his impact truly was.

Guest:

  • Aldon D. Morris, professor of sociology and African-American studies at Northwestern University, author of the book, The Scholar Denied: W.E.B. Du Bois and the birth of modern sociology

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Coming Up On Viewpoints Show 17-48

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Giving Back This Holiday Season

During the holidays, many parents fret over the materialistic messages their children are exposed to. We talk to a mom and an author who together have created a children’s book and game designed to make giving back to others a fun pursuit.

W.E.B. Du Bois’s Lasting Impact in Sociology

At the beginning of the 20th century, W.E.B. Du Bois revolutionized scientific sociology, but was denied accolades because of his race. Now, we talk to scholars about what exactly Du Bois did to improve the study of sociology and what his impact truly was.