18-45 Segment 2: One Woman’s Life in Beatlemania, From Youthful Innocence to Personal Tragedy and Beyond

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Ann Hood was a Beatles fan all her life. Then, tragedy struck and she found herself unable to listen to the band at all. She tells the true story of how she regained her love for the iconic group, and how she channeled her story into a work of fiction pleasing multiple generations of readers.

Guest:

  • Ann Hood, author, She Loves You (Yeah, Yeah, Yeah)

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18-44 Segment 1: Looking Into Our Minds: How our brains perceive the world

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There are all sorts of myths about how we can avoid dementia or how to best brainstorm a new idea. We talk to a psychologist and author to get the inside scoop on how our minds really work, and why we just can’t resist the urge to watch cute animal videos online.

Guest:

  • Bob Duke, professor at the University of Texas-Austin, expert on music and human learning, co-host, “Two Guys on Your Head,” co-author, Brain Briefs: Answers to the most (and least) pressing questions about your mind

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Culture Crash 18-14: Concerts

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The first concert I ever attended was a  Collective Soul show. I went with my family during the 1997 Taste of Chicago. I was 4 years old, so forgive me if my memory is a little hazy, but I do remember it being really, really hot and having a good time, even if i probably was a little confused as to why all those adults were dancing so strange.

Since ’97, I’ve been to my fair share of concerts. I’ve gone to Lollapalooza and been evacuated in the middle of a lightning storm. My friends and I saw a free Mumford and Sons concert in Austin, Texas over spring break. My wife and me trekked through a blizzard to see Hozier at a small club in Chicago right as his song Take Me To Church was blowing up.

I’ve seen Beyonce, Justin Timberlake, and Paul McCartney just…not all at once.

What I’ve learned in all my trips to concerts from dive bars to sold-out stadiums full of people is that there really is something special about being a part of a crowd and watching live music.

There are very few feelings in the world quite like the excitement that runs through your body when the first few notes of your favorite song come on and you know you just get to revel in it for the next 4 or 5 minutes.

You may not be much of a screamer, but once you feel the elation of finally see your favorite artist walk on stage and start playing, you can at least understand what was going on in one of the most famous live music clips of all time, when all those fans lost their minds for The Beatles at the Ed Sullivan show back in 1964.

With summer just around the corner, there will surely be a few bands coming to town you’d love to see. So whether that means buying a ticket to Camila Cabello or Chris Stapleton, splurge a little for the good seats and try to let yourself get carried away half as much of those Beatles fans did 54 years ago.

I’m Evan Rook.

18-12 Segment 2: The Benefits of Music Education

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Over the years, school budgets have faced detrimental cuts that have forced schools to eliminate programs that are not necessary in meeting state curriculums. In many instances, one of the first programs removed from schools is music education. While music education is not a requirement in many state curriculums, researchers believe that educators may want to rethink this decision because of the many benefits that learning an instrument can have on the development of a child.

While learning how to play an instrument is a good hobby for children to take on, it can actually have many more positive benefits than simply being an activity. Dr. Nina Kraus, Director of the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University, explains that there is evidence that supports the belief that music education can help students become better learners in a number of tasks. Furthermore, Dr. Aniruddh Patel, Professor of Psychology at Tufts University, states that learning a musical instrument can enhance the brain’s ability to process the sounds of speech which can play a role in the development of reading abilities, hearing and noise, and memory and attention. This is caused by a biological effect that music can have on the nervous system, as well as the brain. In one study conducted by Dr. Kraus, it showed that trained musicians were better at interpreting emotional sounds which Dr. Kraus explains is due to aspects of music, such as pitch and timing, having a role in speech, too. Dr. Patel supports this evidence by stating that many people who have taken music education have a larger capacity with some verbal and linguistic tasks.

However, in order to cultivate these different developments, it is not enough to just hear music. Dr. Kraus explains that the biological changes found in studies are more prevalent in individuals who actively participated in playing and creating music. Even a minimal amount of music training has been shown to impact brain development. Dr. Kraus states that less than five years of music education still had an impact on many individuals. In order to obtain the most from music, an individual must embark on the task of learning an instrument instead of just listening to it.

Guest:

  • Dr. Nina Kraus, Director of the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory at Northwestern University
  • Dr. Aniruddh Patel, Professor of Psychology at Tufts University

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17-13 Segment 2: Bob Marley’s Legendary Life

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It has been decades since Bob Marley’s death, but his music is still played and his face still shows up on tee shirts. From “One Love” and “Jamming” to “Buffalo Soldier” and “Three Little Birds,” you’ve heard his iconic music, but what about his life and career made such an impact? We talk to two Marley experts, James Henke and Vivien Goldman to uncover what made Marley tick and how his message became so prominent.

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17-02 Segment 1: Uniquely Jazz: Sheila Jordan

 

With “La La Land” tapping into theaters around the country and a strong contender for this year’s Oscars, we wanted to re-visit one of the quintessential American art forms: jazz. And nobody sings jazz better, or more distinctly, than Sheila Jordan. We talk to Jordan and her biographer about Jordan’s rise, the racism that jazz musicians – both black and white – experienced, and the need to preserve from poverty to her career singing with some of the most famous jazz musicians of the 20th century this music for future generations.

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