18-25 Segment 1: Domestic Violence: How It Happens and How to Stop It

VP 18-25 A

 

Domestic violence statistics show that one in three females and one in four males will be the victim of physical or emotional abuse by an intimate partner over the course of their lifetime in the US. The immediate questions from these staggering statistics are why does this happen and what can be done to stop it? Dr. Shannon Karl, Associate Professor in the School of Psychology at Nova Southeastern University in Ft. Lauderdale, FL, and Dr. Jay Richards, forensic psychologist on the faculty of Washington University and Seattle University and author of the novel Silhouette of Virtue, discuss the answers to these essential questions about domestic violence.

The risk factors for becoming an abuser were found to be previous exposure to violence in the home, difficulty  managing emotions like anger, substance abuse, and other environmental and social stresses. While women can also be abusive, a study that profiled abusive men found that, stereotypically, they are egocentric, super ‘macho,’ and dominant, often projecting an aggressive masculinity. These traits are, in many cases, concealed during courtship, but Richards points out several signs that can give them away. Making an entitled demand on a woman’s time or activities is one such sign that this demand will later be enforced with violence. Karl says that children are especially at risk after having witnessed violence, as that can continue the cycle of domestic abuse later on in their own lives.

Domestic violence often functions in a cycle. Richards says that after the abuse the violent partner may feel regret and low self-esteem for what they have done.The aggressor then starts a make up cycle, causing their partner to stay in the unhealthy relationship. He suggests that for those seeking to get out of this situation, they must first find a safe and secure place to get away from the abuser and then seek outside help. A counseling center may be especially helpful, because secrecy helps domestic violence to continue.

Some progress is being made in how law enforcement and government are handling domestic violence, with strict fines and many different programs for counseling. Karl suggests for those seeking help to visit the National Coalition for Domestic Violence website or call the domestic violence hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE.

To get help or to learn more about domestic violence and our guests, visit the links below.

Guests:

  • Dr. Shannon Karl, Associate Professor in the School of Psychology at Nova Southeastern University at Ft. Lauderdale, FL
  • Dr. Jay Richards, forensic psychologist on the faculty of Washington University and Seattle University and author of the novel Silhouette of Virtue

Links for more information:

Share this:

Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Coming Up On Viewpoints Show 18-25

vprlogo

 

Domestic Violence: How It Happens and How to Stop It

Domestic abuse is something many women and men will experience in their lives. We talk to two psychologists familiar with the subject about what victims can do to remove themselves from the abuse and how being a witness to or a victim of abuse affects the intimate relationship, children, and the family dynamic.

How Comedy Became King

Comedy is all around us: all over social media, in advertisements, even on church signs. Former Jeopardy champion Ken Jennings says that while it can be fun, it does come at a cost when jokes are made in arenas where they’re inappropriate. We discuss the history and impact of jokes on our culture.

Culture Crash: A new Spider-Man movie worth getting excited for

Spider-Man movies have been done and redone several times now, but a new animated movie about the web-slinger is coming out in December, and it will finally tell the story from a fresh perspective.

17-28 Segment 1: Domestic Violence: How it happens and how we can try to stop it

 

Coming Up On Viewpoints Show 17-28

vprlogo

Domestic Violence: How it happens and how we can try to stop it

Domestic abuse is something many women and men will experience in their lives. We talk to two psychologists familiar with the subject about what victims can do to remove themselves from the abuse and how being a witness to or a victim of abuse affects the intimate relationship, children and the family dynamic.

Asa Jennings: A forgotten American hero

After World War I, the city of Smyrna was set ablaze and people had to run to the beaches just to escape the flames. We’ll hear how governments and diplomats in the West all but ignored their plight, and how the efforts of one brave relief worker and a Navy commander finally brought the victims to safety.

15-26 Segment 1: Domestic Violence: Why it happens and how it affects the family

 

Synopsis: Domestic abuse is something many women and men will experience in their lives. We talk to two psychologists familiar with the subject about what kind of person perpetrates partner and domestic violence, what victims can do to remove themselves from the abuse, and how being a witness to or a victim of abuse affects the intimate relationship, children and the family dynamic.

Host: Gary Price. Guests: Dr. Shannon Karl, Associate Professor in School of Psychology at Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL; Dr. Jay Richards, forensic psychologist on the faculty of Washington University and Seattle University, author of the novel, Silhouette of Virtue.

Links for more information:

Click here for transcript