18-23 Segment 1: Farming in Cities

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While farming may seem like a rural occupation, urban gardens are starting to infiltrate major cities around the world. Michael Ableman, author of the book Street Farm: Growing Food, Jobs and Hope on the Urban Frontier, is the co-founder and director of Sole Food Street Farms in Vancouver, British Columbia. And, Deirdre Bradley-Turner is the director of Community Service and Service Learning at Emmanuel College in Boston, which is part of the Mission and Ministry Office at the college. These two guests explain the impact that urban farming can have on a community.

An urban garden, Ableman says, not only provides a city with the chance to grow part of its own produce, but also, it feeds the souls of the people who work the plots. At Sole Food Street Farms in Vancouver, these people are usually those dealing with long-term addictions, mental illnesses, or living in poverty. By training and employing them, the urban farms give them a chance to do something meaningful in a community. This has the ability to transforms lives, as they discover the untapped creativity and heart of people who often have society prejudiced against them.

Farming in a city often requires some innovation and accommodation. Ableman explains the smart farming that they have developed, using a system of 8,000 movable growing boxes to produce up to 50 different crops for the city’s restaurants and farmer’s markets.

In Boston, Bradley-Turner explains how three programs at Emmanuel College came together to produce an urban garden, with a focus on educating the community and students about food justice and security. She says that food justice is more than just feeding people who don’t have easy access to food. It’s also about teaching them about nutrition and where their food comes from. The food produced on their farm is distributed to the city’s shelters and to the students who live on the campus.

For more information about these two projects and urban farms, visit the links below.

Guests:

  • Michael Ableman, co-founder and director of Sole Food Street Farms in Vancouver, British Columbia, and author of the book Street Farm: Growing Food, Jobs and Hope on the Urban Frontier
  • Deirdre Bradley-Turner, director of Community Service and Service Learning at Emmanuel College, Boston, which is part of the Mission and Ministry Office at the college

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18-23 Segment 2: Weather: Past and Future

VP 18-23 B

 

While weather is often a day-to-day occurrence for many of us, the history of the earth’s climate and humanity’s relationship to it actually creates a fascinating story. Andrew Revkin, weather expert and historian, summarizes 100 key moments of this chronology in his book Weather: An Illustrated History From Cloud Atlases to Climate Change.

The book gives short introductions to big scientific concepts, starting with the distinction between weather and climate. Revkin quotes, climate is what you expect, and weather is what you get. Going back all the way to the beginning of the earth’s atmosphere 4.6 billion years ago, Revkin tracks the changes in climate since then and several of the atmosphere’s reboots over the years, covering periods of ice, heat, and everything in between.

He also focuses on the way humanity has affected the climate in recent years. For the first time in history, climate will be what we make of it, and we’re the first species to be aware of our impact. He also explains the history of the first weather forecasts and how the innovation in technology, such as the telegraph, made it possible.

For more information or to get your own copy of Revkin’s book, visit the links below.

Guest:

  • Andrew Revkin, weather expert and historian, author of the bookWeather: An Illustrated History From Cloud Atlases to Climate Change

Links for more information:

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Stay in the loop! Follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook! Subscribe and review on iTunes!

Culture Crash 18-23: 4 Books to Read This Summer

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Welcome to Culture Crash, where we examine American culture.  What’s new and old in books, film, and entertainment.

Summer is finally here, and if you’re like me, that means it’s time to get to business on that reading list. I’ve always found that my favorite entertainment source in the summer is to go read a book in the great outdoors.

Of course, picking the right book can be a challenge, because the last thing any of us want is to be bored by a book. Here are four books I’ve read recently that you may want to seek out this summer.

First up, Dark Matter by Blake Crouch. Crouch is most famous for his Wayward Pines series, but don’t sleep on his 2016 scifi thriller Dark Matter. The book tells the story of a man who is abducted and wakes up in another reality. Using some fascinating science fiction, the book is a non-stop page turner perfect for fans of Black Mirror.

Another science fiction read is Elan Mastai’s romp All Our Wrong Todays. The book is similar to Dark Matter in that it deals with alternate realities, but Mastai’s book tells the story of a man from a different world who stumbles into our reality…and finds it to be underwhelming. The book is less a thriller a more of a comedy.

If science fiction isn’t your thing, Fierce Kingdom by Gin Phillips tells a heart-pounding story set in a reality all too real. The book centers on a mother and her young child as their afternoon at the zoo becomes a nightmare after they hear gunshots ring out. The reader is swept along as the two of them try to run, hide, and survive. Set all in one day, Fierce Kingdom’s 290 pages can even be read in one sitting.

And finally, if you are interested in history, you may want to check out The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore. The book tells a dramatized version of true story with national significance: the race to illuminate America between Thomas Edison, George Westinghouse, and the rouge Nikola Tesla. The book paints a wonderful picture of days since past and may just ignite a passion in you to get to the bottom of who really deserves the credit for the incandescent lightbulb.

Dark Matter by Blake Crouch, All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai, Fierce Kingdom by Gin Phillips, and The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore are all available now. For links to more information about all three, visit Viewpoints Online dot net… and when you finish them, feel free to let us know your thoughts on Twitter at Viewpoints Radio.

I’m Evan Rook.